Petronella Fortune is about your age! With a red bucket fastened to the carrier of her bike, she explores the area close to her village, always on the look-out for animals she doesn’t know yet. Then she loves to take them home to study them – even though her father groans and says: “Not another animal!” Her investigations and the results of her research are always suitable for children and giving them an appetite to go out and take a closer look at nature and the environment for themselves. 

 

Petronella is also available in other languages …


Titel_Petronella_300Petronella Fortune – Stories about animals

Petronella Fortune – Stories about animals

Titel_Petronella_300When Petronella grows up, she wants to be study animals, so much is certain. She’ll travel to the Antarctic and cross deserts. With her binoculars in her hand, she’ll slither as silently as a snake over the dusty ground of the prairie and discover the most incredible animal stories that the world has ever heard. But until she can set off on her distant travels alone, she remains living in a small village. Here she knows everyone, and everyone knows her. That’s not so unusual because Petronella gets about all over the place, every day. And if anybody is going to discover something unusual, then it’s Petronella Fortune!

Petronella Fortune
Stories about animals
Language: German, Spanish, Estonian
Author: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrations by Christian Puille
112 pages (12,5 x 19,5 cm)
over 40 colour illustrations
With an afterword about garden animals
67.500 Signs
From age 5


order the german version

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Look into the book:

Petronella Glückschuh Tierkindergeschichten

Titel_Petronella_300Wenn Petronella groß ist, wird sie Tierforscherin. Das steht fest. Sie wird in die Antarktis reisen und Wüsten durchqueren. Mit einem Fernglas in der Hand wird sie lautlos wie eine Schlange über den staubigen Prärieboden kriechen und die unglaublichsten Tiergeschichten aufdecken, die die Welt je gehört hat. Bis sie alleine mit ihren Reisen in die Ferne beginnen kann, lebt sie in einem kleinen Dorf. Hier kennt sie jeden und jeder kennt sie. Das ist auch gar nicht so schwer, weil Petronella sich jeden Tag viel herumtreibt. Und wenn jemand Ungewöhnliches entdeckt, ist es Petronella Glückschuh!


Taschenbuch: 112 Seiten (12,5 x 19,5 cm)
über 40 s/w Illustrationen von Christian Puille
5,95 €
ISBN 978-3-943030-54-9

– lieferbar ab Oktober 2017 –

 

– lieferbar ab Oktober 2017 –

 


jetzt bestellen


Blick ins Buch:

Petronella Glückschuh Tierkindergeschichten

9783000330469Wenn Petronella groß ist, wird sie Tierforscherin. Das steht fest. Sie wird in die Antarktis reisen und Wüsten durchqueren. Mit einem Fernglas in der Hand wird sie lautlos wie eine Schlange über den staubigen Prärieboden kriechen und die unglaublichsten Tiergeschichten aufdecken, die die Welt je gehört hat. Bis sie alleine mit ihren Reisen in die Ferne beginnen kann, lebt sie in einem kleinen Dorf. Hier kennt sie jeden und jeder kennt sie. Das ist auch gar nicht so schwer, weil Petronella sich jeden Tag viel herumtreibt. Und wenn jemand Ungewöhnliches entdeckt, ist es Petronella Glückschuh!


Sprache: Deutsch
Autor: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrationen von Christian Puille
Gelesen von Kornelia Boje
Audio-CD, 78:00 Minuten
9,95 Euro
ISBN 978-3-00-033046-9
Ab 5 Jahre


jetzt bestellen : AUDIO-CD

jetzt bestellen : AUDIO-DOWNLOAD


Hörprobe:

Tierkindergeschichten:

Titelsong:


Petronella Glückschuh Tierkindergeschichten

Titel_Petronella_300Wenn Petronella groß ist, wird sie Tierforscherin. Das steht fest. Sie wird in die Antarktis reisen und Wüsten durchqueren. Mit einem Fernglas in der Hand wird sie lautlos wie eine Schlange über den staubigen Prärieboden kriechen und die unglaublichsten Tiergeschichten aufdecken, die die Welt je gehört hat. Bis sie alleine mit ihren Reisen in die Ferne beginnen kann, lebt sie in einem kleinen Dorf. Hier kennt sie jeden und jeder kennt sie. Das ist auch gar nicht so schwer, weil Petronella sich jeden Tag viel herumtreibt. Und wenn jemand Ungewöhnliches entdeckt, ist es Petronella Glückschuh!


E-book, 112 Seiten
über 40 farbige Illustrationen
ISBN 978-3-943030-11-2

Dieses Buch ist auch als E-Book erhältlich:

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Petronella is a cheeky little bundle of energy, whose entertaining adventures encourage children to investigate nature and its (smallest) creatures. With her unusual discoveries, Petronella manages to illustrate bigger issues through small everyday wonders.

LandKIND [magazine for children living in the countryside] 05/2013

 

 

Petronella embodies the desire shared by many children to be free and independent, not just to go to school all the time, but to explore the world.

Working group for youth literature and media, of the Union for Education and Science

 

 

Petronella Fortune is an inquisitive character who introduces children to animals. With Petronella, they learn that animals are not just soft and cuddly pets, but also gain an understanding of their vulnerability. The stories tackle serious issues, and almost always find solutions and positive responses to all problems which Petronella encounters.

Daniela Schrudde, MD, Foundation for Species Protection

Petronella’s tame deer (brief summary)

Petronella and her dog Stitch find an orphaned fawn in the middle of a field. “The poor creature must feel like it’s been abandoned,” thinks Petronella and takes it home with her. At home, her father shakes his head. “It’s already like a farm here!” Of course, Petronella gets to keep her little fawn anyway. But she soon finds out it’s hard work to raise a little deer all by herself!

The mouse in the vacuum cleaner (brief summary)

“Don’t expect me to tidy up after you!” grumbles Petronella’s mother. She has been in a bad mood all day because she’s got so much work to do and doesn’t even get to relax at the weekend. Petronella decides to give her mum a hand, fetches the vacuum cleaner from the cellar and hauls it into the living room. “To get under the sofa, you really need to use the pipe,” she thinks as she takes off the vacuum cleaner head, and immediately sucks up a little mouse! Her cat Mira has probably brought it into the house. Of course, a little mouse is much more interesting than vacuum cleaning and needs to be investigated straight away!

The swinging hedgehog (brief summary)

It is winter. One afternoon, Petronella’s big sister Philine brings something very special home. “Petronella, come quick, I’ve found a hedgehog.” Petronella hurtles down the stairs. Wow! A real hedgehog! Luckily, Petronella is allowed to keep the hedgehog and help him get through the winter. Petronella learns a lot about hedgehogs, takes care of him until he begins his winter sleep and is there for him when he finally wakes up again.

Snails with herb butter (brief summary)

Today the family is going on an outing. It has rained heavily during the night, and the snails are out in force. Petronella eagerly collects them all up, hoping that she will get to watch them have baby snails. But when the family stops at a restaurant, the snails crawl out of Petronella’s bag and make a break for freedom…

Kittens under the bed (brief summary)

Petronella’s cat Mira is a busy mummy cat. Twice a year she has kittens. Luckily, she has chosen to have her kittens in the drawer under Petronella’s bed this time, which is really handy for Petronella. She only needs to pull the drawer out a bit and can even observe the family of cats during the night. She watches closely as Mira has her kittens and sees how she takes care of them. “Where are we supposed to keep all the cats?” moans Petronella’s father. Petronella promises that she will look after them, and she keeps her promise. But soon afterwards, Mira the mummy cat disappears! Her father has taken her to a farm far away. He didn’t want any more kittens… When Petronella finally gets her way and persuades her father to fetch Mira back, she’s nowhere to be found at the farm. In the meantime, she has set off on the long journey home, all by herself, and finally makes it back just in time for Christmas. “You brave cat! You can stay with us for ever!” promises Petronella’s father faithfully under the Christmas tree.

Charlie the tortoise (brief summary)

Petronella decides to supplement her pocket money. In her room, she writes in bold letters on a piece of paper: “Welcome to Petronella’s Animal Hotel.” Alongside she draws a dog, a cat and a little mouse. She then writes: “My animal shelter offers good-quality affordable accommodation for your pets. Every animal will be welcomed as one of the family.” A couple of days later, an old man stands at their door, carrying a tortoise under his arm. “I don’t believe it!” says Petronella’s father. “Not another animal!” But he decides to let “Charlie” stay, and Petronella learns a lot about tortoises and about the different lifespans of people and animals…

Worms in jam jars and a mouse skeleton on a string

Any proper animal researcher obviously needs a research laboratory. Definitely, thinks Petronella. This is why she is busy arranging empty jam jars in her garden shed. She moves the camping table against the window, sweeps the floor, unscrews the desk lamp in her bedroom and attaches it to her new workplace in the shed.

Then she notices that there’s no power socket. After thinking for a moment, she remembers that there is an extension cable for the lawn mower in the tool cellar. There is also a power socket in the cellar. “Right, let’s get to work,” thinks Petronella. Setting up a laboratory can be hard work. She winds the cable out of the cellar all the way down the garden, right to little wooden house in the furthest corner, which is no longer a garden shed but a top secret research laboratory.

Petronella writes on a sheet of paper:

No entry!

Research laboratory on secret mission!

She attaches the sign to the laboratory door with sticky tape. “Finally my very own research laboratory!” says Petronella happily. Over the table she hangs her old dolls’ wardrobe, into which she now places tweezers, scissors, a magnifying glass, plasters, the contents of her doctor’s case and cotton wool so that they are all within easy reach.

And most importantly, an empty exercise book for neatly recording all her observations. As her first research subject, she decides to study earthworms.

Petronella fills some big jam jars with different types of soil. Then she labels the jars. Compost, flowerbed soil, sandy soil. Her mother’s jam jar labels work brilliantly.

Now she needs to look for some worms. Petronella wonders where it will be easiest to find earthworms in her garden. She takes a thick screwdriver from her father’s toolbox and levers up the edges of the natural stone slabs in the barbecue area. The worms have been tunnelling underneath the stone slabs, where it is shady and damp. If she lifts up a slab and quickly grabs the worms, she can pull them out before they disappear into the earth.

Petronella carefully chooses worms of different lengths and thicknesses.

After she has collected sixty-nine worms, she decides to clean them properly first. After all, in a proper laboratory, everything needs to be sterile and clean. She takes her toothbrush from the bathroom, a plastic bowl with a little warm water and begins to scrub the worms carefully. They turn lovely and pink. Whilst she is hanging out her washing to dry in the garden, Petronella’s mother sees her daughter engaged in this unusual activity.

“Yuck, what on earth are you doing?”

“I’m cleaning worms!”

“Let the poor worms go. They belong in the earth.”

“I’ve finished now.” Petronella takes her sixty-nine clean and shiny worms into the garden shed. She now uses the ruler to carefully measure each individual worm and records its length in the exercise book.

It’s really not that easy to stretch the worms straight along the ruler. Worms don’t like being pulled at both ends. This is Petronella’s first important research finding.

Soon her worms are all in the jam jars. On top of the soil she plants grass and lays old foliage and leaves, so that they have got something to eat.

That same day, Petronella gets to extend her research when her cat Mira leaves a dead mouse on the stairs to the cellar and decides not to eat it. What luck! Petronella Fortune has wanted a mouse skeleton for ages.

She ties the mouse’s tail to a light blue string and hangs the dead mouse upside down on a nail over the entrance to the laboratory.

Petronella wants to see how long it takes for the mouse to turn into a mouse skeleton.

Philine is passing and pops in to see Petronella. “What are you doing?”

“I’m doing research!” answers Petronella and points to her sign.

Philine spots the dead mouse on the string. “That’s not the way to do it. You need to find a red anthill and place the dead mouse inside it.”

Philine has a habit of always knowing better when it comes to Petronella’s ideas.

“Let me do it my way. I’ve tried leaving a dead butterfly in an anthill and after a couple of hours there was nothing left.”

“Well, with a butterfly, there wouldn’t be a skeleton anyway.”

“Aargh, I know that now!” answers Petronella. Angrily, she slams the door of the garden shed and suggests Philine find her own things to do.

After all, the garden shed is now her laboratory and her special place.

Every day, Petronella observes the worms in the jars as well as the mouse on the string. The poor mouse does start to look a little gruesome as the days pass, but it’s really quite interesting to see the mouse’s skeleton.

Petronella moistens the soil in the jam jars occasionally, so that the worms do not dry out. It is fascinating that the worms always come to the surface when Petronella pours water into the jars. That needs to be noted.

The next day, Petronella’s parents have invited their good friend Helga to a barbecue. Helga is the same age as Petronella’s mother. She is a primary school teacher and Petronella likes her a lot.

When the whole family has finished eating and are sitting in the garden, Petronella asks Helga proudly: “Would you like me to show you my research laboratory?”

Helga seems very interested. Excited, Petronella takes her into her garden shed. She shows her the earthworm jars and her exercise book.

“You’ve done a lovely job,” says Helga, praising Petronella and smiling at her kindly. “I have got something else to show you,” says Petronella.

She looks at the spot where she had hung the mouse, but only the tail of the mouse is still dangling on the string.

“Whoops-a-daisy,” says Petronella, lifts the dead mouse up off the floor and holds it out to Helga.

The stone-dead mouse is now a very sorry sight indeed. Although it was hanging in the air on the string, its little body is covered with little fat worms and grubs, and just a few scraps of fur remain.

Squealing with terror, Helga runs into the garden. She can hardly breathe, and is suddenly very angry.

“How could you do such a thing?” she shrieks, gasping for breath. Helga does not want to stay at the Fortunes’ any longer. She is extremely upset and will not calm down. She drives home straight away.

Petronella is surprised. As Helga races off in her car, Petronella’s mother explains that her friend is terrified of mice.

“But how can a grown-up be afraid of such a little dead mouse?” asks Petronella, utterly confused.

Her mother explains that Helga had a terrible experience with a dead mouse when she was a little girl.

Helga wanted to show her friend how quickly she could climb a tree. Skilfully, she started to clamber upwards.

As she grabbed hold of a forked branch, she suddenly grasped something soft and sticky. It was a dead mouse which a bird of prey had left there. Helga was so startled that she fell out of the tree. “And she has been afraid of mice ever since!”

Petronella’s mother clears the mouse away. “Anyway, that’s not the way to get a mouse skeleton. The bones are too small and will fall apart.”

She promises to take Petronella and Philine to a dinosaur museum at the weekend, so that Petronella can see some big skeletons which are all in one piece.

“Oh yes, that’s a wonderful idea!” says Petronella happily.

Dorothea Flechsig

Author – Dorothea Flechsig worked for many years as a journalist for various newspapers and magazines. Meanwhile she has published several novels, mainly for children.  She has trained as a scriptwriter and teaches Creative Writing to adults and children.

www.dorothea-flechsig.com

christian Puille

Illustrations – Christian Puille studied communication design in Augsburg and at the University of Ulster, Belfast. He works as an illustrator, storyboarder, production designer and gives workshops at several colleges.


Petronella_NaturPetronella Fortune – Stories about nature 

Petronella Fortune – Stories about nature

Petronella_Natur

When Petronella grows up, she wants to be study animals, so much is certain. She’ll travel to the Antarctic and cross deserts. With her binoculars in her hand, she’ll slither as silently as a snake over the dusty ground of the prairie and discover the most incredible animal stories that the world has ever heard. But until she can set off on her distant travels alone, she remains living in a small village. Here she knows everyone, and everyone knows her. That’s not so unusual because Petronella gets about all over the place, every day. And if anybody is going to discover something unusual, then it’s Petronella Fortune!
In the second volume, Petronella ventures once more into nature and makes the most astonishing discoveries. She rescues a queen bee, catches a mole, takes in chickens for the winter, and treats her granny with leeches. Petronella feeds a jay and finds out how long her parents find the chirping of crickets romantic. Her dog Cuddles and her friend Claudia also take part in the stories once more.

Petronella Fortune
Stories about nature
Language: German, Spanish, Estonian
Author: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrations by Katrin Inzinger
112 pages (12,5 x 19,5 cm)
with over 40 colour illustrations
With an afterword about bees
68.700 Signs
From age 5


order the german version

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Look into the book:

Petronella Glückschuh Naturforschergeschichten

Petronella_NaturPetronella erlebt neue Abenteuer in der Natur und macht wieder die ungewöhnlichsten Entdeckungen. Sie rettet eine Bienenkönigin, fängt einen Maulwurf, lässt Hühner bei sich überwintern und behandelt ihre Oma mit Blutegeln. Petronella füttert einen Eichelhäher und klärt, wie lange die Eltern das Zirpen von Grillen romantisch finden. Ihre Hündin Kordel und Freundin Claudia sind wieder mit dabei.


Taschenbuch: 112 Seiten (12,5 x 19,5 cm)
Sprache: Deutsch
Autor: Dorothea Flechsig
über 40 s/w Illustrationen von Katrin Inzinger und Christian Puille
Ab 5 Jahre
5,95 €
ISBN 978-3-943030-55-6

– lieferbar ab Oktober 2017 –



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Blick ins Buch:

Petronella Glückschuh Naturforschergeschichten

9783943030051Petronella erlebt neue Abenteuer in der Natur und macht wieder die ungewöhnlichsten Entdeckungen. Sie rettet eine Bienenkönigin, fängt einen Maulwurf, lässt Hühner bei sich überwintern und behandelt ihre Oma mit Blutegeln. Petronella füttert einen Eichelhäher und klärt, wie lange die Eltern das Zirpen von Grillen romantisch finden. Ihre Hündin Kordel und Freundin Claudia sind wieder mit dabei.


Sprache: Deutsch
Autor: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrationen von Christian Puille
Gelesen von Kornelia Boje
Audio-CD, 78:00 Minuten
9,95 €
ISBN 978-3-943030-05-1
Ab 5 Jahre


jetzt bestellen : AUDIO-CD

jetzt bestellen : AUDIO-DOWNLOAD


Hörprobe

Naturforschergeschichten:

Titelsong:


Petronella Glückschuh Naturforschergeschichten

Petronella_NaturPetronella erlebt neue Abenteuer in der Natur und macht wieder die ungewöhnlichsten Entdeckungen. Sie rettet eine Bienenkönigin, fängt einen Maulwurf, lässt Hühner bei sich überwintern und behandelt ihre Oma mit Blutegeln. Petronella füttert einen Eichelhäher und klärt, wie lange die Eltern das Zirpen von Grillen romantisch finden. Ihre Hündin Kordel und Freundin Claudia sind wieder mit dabei.


E-book, 112 Seiten
über 40 farbige Illustrationen
ISBN 978-3-943030-24-2


Dieses Buch ist auch als E-Book erhältlich:

button_shop_amazon button_shop_libri

Petronella is a cheeky little bundle of energy, whose entertaining adventures encourage children to investigate nature and its (smallest) creatures. With her unusual discoveries, Petronella manages to illustrate bigger issues through small everyday wonders.

LandKIND [magazine for children living in the countryside] 05/2013

 

 

Petronella embodies the desire shared by many children to be free and independent, not just to go to school all the time, but to explore the world.

Working group for youth literature and media, of the Union for Education and Science

 

 

Petronella Fortune is an inquisitive character who introduces children to animals. With Petronella, they learn that animals are not just soft and cuddly pets, but also gain an understanding of their vulnerability. The stories tackle serious issues, and almost always find solutions and positive responses to all problems which Petronella encounters.

Daniela Schrudde, MD, Foundation for Species Protection

The very best medicine (brief summary)

Petronella catches a couple of particularly big leeches in the stream. She needs them urgently for her grandma Anneliese. Her knee is aching, and Petronella happened to hear a woman on the radio this morning claiming “Leeches were my miracle cure! I’m healthy again thanks to these worms!” Since her grandma is asleep, Petronella proceeds with the treatment all by herself. “Perhaps that’s not such a bad thing!” thinks Petronella. “She’ll have even more of a surprise!” But then, which one was the bad knee? And do you just stick the leeches on?

Hello Tweety! (brief summary)

Petronella and her friend Claudia watch as the cat stalks silently along the ground, pounces and catches a little jaybird. Petronella and Claudia manage to save the little bird, but since Petronella knows that birds will no longer feed their babies if they smell of humans, she now needs to look after the little bird herself. “Jaay! Jaay, jaay!” Petronella’s father hears little Tweety’s calls coming from the children’s room. As he enters the room, even before he opens his mouth to speak, Petronella blurts out, “You don’t need to do anything. I’ll look after him all by myself, with Claudia! Besides, a jay isn’t really a pet. And anyway Mum has already said I’m allowed.” But it’s not that easy…

Petronella introduces a mole to the world (brief summary)

Petronella’s father is annoyed about a mole in the garden. He tries repeatedly to catch the mole, but only Petronella has any luck. “Well done! You’ve done a great job,” says Petronella’s father. “Now we need to take him to a meadow far away from here!” But Petronella feels sorry for the mole. After all, he lives in the dark and hasn’t experienced anything of the world, not even colours or music. Petronella has a bright idea and asks her father to play the mole a song on the harmonica. The whole family gathers together. Trying to guess where the mole’s ears are, they notice that it is quite fat.

“It’s a mummy mole!” realises Petronella at last. “She probably has a mate waiting for her underground!” “That mole is not coming back in my garden!” insists Petronella’s father. But Petronella finally gets her way and releases the mummy mole back into the garden. “I’d like to know who’s actually in charge here!” says Petronella’s father. Petronella’s mother hugs him and replies: “You are, of course!”But we all know it’s Petronella.

Late night concert (brief summary)

Petronella’s parents have been arguing, so Petronella goes off to the pet shop to buy crickets! She remembers how they put everybody in a good mood on their last holiday. The crickets chirped and her parents often hugged each other and were always happy. Petronella distributes a total of 27 crickets around the living room. But unfortunately they remain silent… until the night time, when they begin their concert. Petronella is woken by a door slamming loudly. “I can’t sleep with all this noise!” yells Petronella’s mother loudly throughout the house. Wrapped in a blanket, Petronella’s father also comes into the living room. Petronella and her parents set about recapturing every last cricket.

Luckily,it’s great fun and their argument is quickly forgotten. Petronella is very happy that her cricket trick did work after all.

Fly, fly, queen bee (brief summary)

In the little village where Petronella Fortune lives, there is a particularly beautiful overgrown garden. Hidden behind some bushes is a stack of brightly coloured boxes swarming with thousands, if not tens of thousands of bees. One day Petronella gets to know the beekeeper. He explains all about bee colonies and asks if Petronella would like to help him. “I’ve finished for today! But tomorrow I’ve got to clip the old queen bee’s wing!” he says. Petronella asks him why. “I do it so that she stays here in the garden, otherwise she and her colony would be long gone!” explains the beekeeper.

Petronella thinks this is really cruel and, together with her friend Claudia, she comes up with an exciting plan to rescue and liberate the queen bee…

When the cockerel crows

Over the last few days, a Siberian chill seems to have swept across Bergluch. The villagers of Bergluch have all withdrawn into their warm houses. Hardly any cars are out, and the streets are empty except for the bus, which continues to stop at the bus stops three times a day without fail, even though there are no passengers waiting to get on.

“Nobody could stand being outside in this cold for long!” decides Petronella.

“And it’s supposed to get even colder tonight,” announces Petronella’s father, reading out loud from the newspaper. “Please don’t let the fire go out, then it will be nice and warm when we get home tonight.”

Petronella’s mother has been beaming happily to herself all morning. Today she will be seeing her brother Bernhard again for the first time in three and a half years. He has been living in Canada for a long time and hardly ever visits Germany.

Petronella’s parents are collecting Bernhard from the airport. He is arriving in Frankfurt this evening. It will take them several hours to drive back from the airport. Philine and Petronella are allowed to stay at home on their own.

Since yesterday, Petronella’s mother has been busy baking, cooking, cleaning and preparing the guest room for her brother.

Both the girls are looking forward to seeing their uncle. Whenever he visits, there is always lots of fun and laughter.

When Petronella and Philine have said goodbye to their parents, Petronella puts on her thick down jacket and wraps her long scarf round her neck.

“I’m just going to see the chickens!” she says. “I think Gregory the cockerel is feeling the cold today. He hasn’t even been clucking or crowing. I’ve never known him so quiet.”

Philine is sprawling on the sofa and leafing through a catalogue. “Yeah, you do that,” she says, without the slightest interest.

For a whole week, Petronella has been going over to their neighbour’s little wooden shed every morning and evening to feed his hens and the cockerel Gregory.

Every year, their neighbour Mr. Schulze and his wife Gisela go off on their winter holidays “to get some southern sun”, as Mr. Schulze calls it. Petronella has to look after his hens until they return to snowy Bergluch.

In return, she gets to keep the fresh eggs from the nest every day. And anyway, she loves doing this job.

The moment Petronella opens the door, she is blasted by the icy cold air. Quickly, she runs across the frozen snow to the chicken shed next door.

The snow crunches beneath her feet. Petronella opens the shed door: The four hens and Gregory are sitting on the perch with their feathers all fluffed up.

Petronella fills the bowl with fresh grains and also tries to give the hens fresh water, but the water in the watering can is frozen.

She collects three eggs from the nests and notices that the shells are cracked.

Petronella is shocked. “Even the eggs are frozen.”

Feeling sorry for the chickens, she decides to lure them from the neighbour’s garden into her house so that they do not freeze to death in their shed.

“Cluck, cluck, cluck, come with me, sweethearts! It’s nice and warm in our living room!” she calls to the hens and the cockerel.

Petronella scatters a trail of grains on the ground, and all the hens really do follow her out of the shed, onto the street, up to the garden gate, up a step, into her garden and round the side of the house all the way to the patio door.

Stitch wags his tail as the hens and Gregory come into the living room, clucking cautiously.

Mira the cat jumps off the chair and disappears upstairs into Petronella’s room.

“Are you mad? What are the chickens doing here?” moans Philine.

“They’re warming up!” replies Petronella. “Because it’s so cold outside. And it’s supposed to get even colder tonight. Their drinking water and the eggs are already frozen!”

Philine sighs. “But there’s no space for them here!”

“And where else am I supposed to put them?” “In Schulze’s house!”

“Hmm.” Petronella scratches her head. “But I don’t have a key!”

“Then they’ve got to go back to the shed!”

At that moment, Gregory the cockerel makes a strange cooing noise. Or rather, it wasn’t his usual crowing noise. Petronella points at him and glares at her sister.

“There you are! Poor Gregory has caught a cold! Do you want him to get really ill?”

“No, no, I don’t!” protests Petronella’s sister. “But the chickens can’t stay here either!”

“Then we’ll put them in the bathroom!” suggests Petronella. And off she goes, leaving another trail of grains. “Cluck, cluck, cluck!”

“I can’t wait to hear what Mum’s got to say about this,” calls Philine after her. “She’s only just cleaned all the tiles.”

But nothing will stop Petronella. Using her trick with the grains, she lures all the hens and the cockerel away from the warm fire and into the bathroom.

To provide seating for her overnight guests, she lays a broom handle over the bath and then lifts the hens and the cockerel onto it one at a time. Their feathers feel nice and warm.

“At least you’re not cold any more!” says Petronella happily.

She cleans her teeth and washes her hands, as it’s now nearly bedtime. She then wishes them all a good night, turns off the light and closes the door.

The chickens and the cockerel remain still and quiet. They seem to feel quite happy in the freshly cleaned bathroom.

When Petronella’s parents are away, Petronella is allowed to sleep in bed with her big sister.

“You and your crazy ideas!” grumbles Philine as Petronella comes into the room.

“The cockerel and the chickens would never ever have frozen to death in the shed!”

Philine is old enough to have her own laptop and also knows how to use it. Snuggling up with Petronella, she surfs the internet and reads aloud everything she can find out about chickens.

“There, look! Like all birds, chickens can fluff up their feathers to keep themselves warm, even at very low temperatures.”

There is lots more to read and learn. “Penguins at the South Pole can even survive in temperatures as low as minus 40°C.”

Even so, decides Petronella, Gregory the cockerel and his hens should not go back to the cold shed tonight. Maybe they would not have frozen to death straight away, but it’s definitely much cosier in a warm bathroom.

When Petronella’s parents come home late in the night, Petronella and Philine are already fast asleep.

Petronella’s father is the first to need the toilet after the long journey. He switches on the light and groans:

“Oh no! I don’t believe it!”

Under the critical eye of Gregory the cockerel, he cautiously squeezes past the bath to the toilet. Petronella’s father is careful not to make any false moves that might provoke the cockerel, as Gregory seems upset at being woken up. But Petronella’s father urgently needs to go to the toilet.

“Just calm down! I’m not going to hurt you and I’ll be out of your way again shortly!” he promises the cockerel and his hens.

Back down in the living room, he tells the others about his strange encounter in the bathroom.

“A cockerel in the bathroom! Nothing surprises me any more,” laughs Petronella’s uncle Bertie.

During the journey home, Petronella’s parents were already telling Bertie about everything that had happened since they last saw him. And Petronella’s adventures were a particularly interesting topic of conversation.

They continue chatting happily about themselves and the children, all through the night until the dawn crow of the cockerel.

And this morning the cockerel produced a particularly fine crow, a “cock-a-doodle-do” which echoed deafeningly around the freshly cleaned bathroom!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothea Flechsig

Author – Dorothea Flechsig worked for many years as a journalist for various newspapers and magazines. Meanwhile she has published several novels, mainly for children.  She has trained as a scriptwriter and teaches Creative Writing to adults and children.

www.dorothea-flechsig.com

Katrin Inzinger

IllustrationsKatrin Inzinger works as an illustrator, character designer, animator and storyboarder. She lives with her family in Berlin.


Petronella Fortune – Stories of Animal Friendships

Petronella Fortune – Stories of Animal Friendships

In the third volume, Petronella enjoys more adventures with animals. But Petronella’s heroic deeds land her in difficult situations. It’s not easy rescuing rabbits, training raccoons, taming squirrels or persuading your parents that a real animal lover often has to take big risks.

Petronella Fortune
Stories of Animal Friendships
Language: German
Author: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrations by Katrin Inzinger
112 pages (12,5 x 19,5 cm)
with over 40 colour illustrations
With an afterword about racoons
68.500 Signs
From age 5


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(German) Titelsong:

Look into the book:

Petronella Glückschuh – Tierfreundschaftsgeschichten

9783943030563Wahre Tierfreunde müssen viel riskieren, um dreiste Eierdiebe zu fassen,Waschbären zu erziehen, Blindschleichen zu retten oder von geliebten Guppys geküsst zu werden.

Bei den Glückschuhs ist immer etwas los! Hündin Kordel, Freundin Claudia und Oma Anneliese sind natürlich auch wieder mit dabei.

Petronellas Abenteuer sind geeignet für Kinder ab einem Interessenalter von 5 Jahren.

Sprache: Deutsch
Autor: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrationen von Katrin Inzinger
Gelesen von Kornelia Boje
Audio-CD, 79:00 Minuten
9,95 Euro
ISBN 978-3-943030-56-3
Ab 5 Jahre

– lieferbar ab Oktober 2017



jetzt bestellen

Petronella Glückschuh – Tierfreundschaftsgeschichten

Noch mehr Abenteuer mit Tieren! Petronellas Heldentaten bringen sie in schwierige Situationen! Es ist gar nicht so leicht, Stallhasen zu retten, Waschbären zu erziehen, dreiste Eierdiebe zu schnappen und den Eltern klar zu machen, dass ein wahrer Tierfreund oft viel riskieren muss.

Wieder macht Petronella Kinderträume wahr: Sie fragt nicht erst, bevor sie etwas tut und lässt sich nichts vorschreiben, ihre Erfahrungen macht Petronella alleine.

Petronella motiviert Kinder, selber in die Natur zu gehen und sie zu erforschen!

Erschienen als Buch und Hörbuch sind Petronellas Tierkindergeschichten und Naturforschergeschichten. Ihr Kinderatlas Deutschland, Umwelt, Tiere entstand zusammen mit dem Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland wurde mehrfach ausgezeichnet. Hierin stellt Petronella jungen Lesern deutsche Natur- und Nationalparke und die dort lebenden Tiere vor.

Petronellas Abenteuer sind geeignet für Kinder ab einem Interessenalter von 5 Jahren. Gelesen werden ihre Bücher von Kindern, Jungen wie Mädchen, bis 10 Jahre.

Sprache: Deutsch
Autor: Dorothea Flechsig
Illustrationen von Katrin Inzinger
Ab 5 Jahre
Mit einem Nachwort “Wissenswertes über Waschbären”
Mit über 40 farbige Illustrationen
ISBN 978-3-943030-51-8

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Petronella is a cheeky little bundle of energy, whose entertaining adventures encourage children to investigate nature and its (smallest) creatures. With her unusual discoveries, Petronella manages to illustrate bigger issues through small everyday wonders.

LandKIND [magazine for children living in the countryside] 05/2013

 

 

Petronella embodies the desire shared by many children to be free and independent, not just to go to school all the time, but to explore the world.

Working group for youth literature and media, of the Union for Education and Science

 

 

Petronella Fortune is an inquisitive character who introduces children to animals. With Petronella, they learn that animals are not just soft and cuddly pets, but also gain an understanding of their vulnerability. The stories tackle serious issues, and almost always find solutions and positive responses to all problems which Petronella encounters.

Daniela Schrudde, MD, Foundation for Species Protection

„Petronella ist ein totaler Tierfreund und kümmert sich gern um die Tiere, die ihr so über den Weg laufen. Die erste Geschichte in diesem Buch ist schon sehr spannend und es ist interessant, wie sie auf eine Lösung für das Problem kommt. Die Tiere sind wieder sehr unterschiedlich und man kann viel über die Tierwelt lernen. Wer sich für Waschbären, Blindschleichen, Hühner, Hasen, Eierdiebe und Guppys interessiert, sollte dieses Buch auf jeden Fall gelesen haben.“ cat10367

Die Buchstaben sind groß genug für Leseanfänger und die sehr schönen Bilder lassen einen noch besser in die einzelnen Geschichten eintauchen. Wir, Mein Sohn (7) und ich, fanden das Buch klasse und sind schon auf weitere kleine Tierabenteuer von Petronella gespannt.“ dru07

Auch den dritten Teil der Petronella-Reihe haben wir begeistert gelesen. Petronella hat immer wieder neue Ideen um es den Tieren zu ermöglichen gut und möglichst artgerecht zu leben. Uns hat ganz besonders die Geschichte mit dem Waschbären gefallen. Die Tiere sind auch wirklich niedlich. … Am Ende dieses Buches gibt es eine kurze und sehr informative Zusammenfassung über Waschbären. Es ist ein Buch das wir wirklich sehr gerne weiterempfehlen. anke3006

Dorothea Flechsig

Author – Dorothea Flechsig worked for many years as a journalist for various newspapers and magazines. Meanwhile she has published several novels, mainly for children.  She has trained as a scriptwriter and teaches Creative Writing to adults and children.

www.dorothea-flechsig.com

Katrin Inzinger

IllustrationsKatrin Inzinger works as an illustrator, character designer, animator and storyboarder. She lives with her family in Berlin.